Journal cover Journal topic
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
NHESS cover
Executive editors: 
Uwe
Ulbrich
,
 Heidi Kreibich & Bruce D. Malamud

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS) is an interdisciplinary and international journal dedicated to the public discussion and open-access publication of high-quality studies and original research on natural hazards and their consequences. Embracing a holistic Earth system science approach, NHESS serves a wide and diverse community of research scientists, practitioners, and decision makers concerned with detection of natural hazards, monitoring and modelling, vulnerability and risk assessment, and the design and implementation of mitigation and adaptation strategies, including economical, societal, and educational aspects.

News

International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSN) now includable in article assets

19 May 2017

Since early 2016, Copernicus Publications has been enabling authors to connect their articles with underlying or related material such as research data, model code, or scientific videos. To enhance reproducibility it is now also possible to include International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs) as assets.

EGU journals: celebrations and growth

16 May 2017

In 2016, the 17 EGU–Copernicus peer-reviewed open-access journals experienced significant growth. We published over 3300 final-revised papers, corresponding to some 53,500 pages, a growth of about 10% compared to the previous year. These papers were downloaded over 645,000 times.

A case of editorial malpractice detected

13 Feb 2017

Recently we have become aware of a case of scientific malpractice by an editor of two of our journals (SOIL and SE) who used the position as editor and reviewer to disproportionately promote citations to personal papers and associated journals. Please read the published editorial.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

In March 2015, a new international blueprint for disaster risk reduction (DRR) has been adopted in Sendai, Japan, at the end of the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR, March 14–18, 2015). We review and discuss the agreed commitments and targets, as well as the negotiation leading the Sendai Framework for DRR (SFDRR), and discuss briefly its implication for the later UN-led negotiations on sustainable development goals and climate change.

Jaroslav Mysiak, Swenja Surminski, Annegret Thieken, Reinhard Mechler, and Jeroen Aerts

In March 2014, a commercial airliner vanished without a trace. The wreckage of the plane was never recovered, except for a small part of the wing that washed up 17 months after the disappearance. In this paper we show a method to model the most likely trajectories of floating debris from the aircraft. The results show that the location of the recovered aircraft part is compatible with the assumed crash site and predict that further debris may be found along the African east coast.

Eric Jansen, Giovanni Coppini, and Nadia Pinardi

Here, we aim to better understand the potential for using video games in volcanic hazard education with at-risk communities. A study using a bespoke-designed video game - St. Vincent's Volcano - was trialled on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent in 2015. Preliminary data analysis demonstrates 94% of study participants had an improved knowledge of volcanic hazards after playing the game, leading us to conclude that video games could be a logical progression for education and outreach activities.

L. Mani, P. D. Cole, and I. Stewart

Inundations on the Black Sea coast of the Krasnodar territory of the Russian Federation were analysed for 1945 to 2013. Risks, hazards and damage from inundations here are some of the highest in the country. The large quantity and the extremeness of rainfall, and the intense flood regimes of the rivers are the main contributors. Additionally, anthropogenic impact such as badly planned economic activities in channels, floodplains and on river watersheds strongly enhance the effects.

N. Alexeevsky, D. V. Magritsky, K. P. Koltermann, I. Krylenko, and P. Toropov

Many urban areas experience both fluvial and pluvial floods, thus this study aims to analyse fluvial and pluvial flood hazards as well as combined pluvial and fluvial flood hazards. This combined fluvial-pluvial flood hazard analysis is performed in a tropical environment for Can Tho city in the Mekong Delta. The final results are probabilistic hazard maps, showing the maximum inundation caused by floods of different magnitudes along with an uncertainty estimation.

H. Apel, O. Martínez Trepat, N. N. Hung, D. T. Chinh, B. Merz, and N. V. Dung

Publications Copernicus